Floating: Ultimate Relief During Pregnancy


Floating in a floatation room can help pregnant women to literally float through pregnancy with a level of calm and comfort. Many women find that it is virtually impossible to get comfortable during this time.

floating-pregnant_on-backFloatation therapy is becoming increasingly popular with pregnant women because it offers intense stress and pain relief that they can’t receive anywhere else in a safe and nurturing environment.

The float room is filled with skin temperature warm water (93.5) only 10 inches deep and over 1000 pounds of Epsom salt (magnesium sulphate), which means that your whole body is suspended and allows you to escape the pressure of the added weight of the baby when they float. By entering a weightless environment, all of the pressure and strain is lifted from the body.

Health Benefits

Floating offers many phsysical and mental health benefits to pregnant women.

Mentally, pregnant women often have many things to worry about, but floating offers them a chance to detach themselves from the rest of the world and simply focus on bonding with their child.

While you’re floating your mind produces slow theta brainwaves, which make you thought patterns clearer and more creative, as well as releases endorphins – the hormones responsible for happiness.

Since sleep is often an issue, especially towards the end of the pregnancy, floating is a wonderful way to gain significant rest. Floating has been shown to help with insomnia and provide deep sleep at night for days after a float session.

In addition, floating reportedly offers many other health benefits, such as lowered blood pressure, and the Epsom salt solution assists with allowing you to absorb lots of magnesium from the solution in the float pod and decreasing inflammation.

While floating, the usual aches and pains of pregnancy are reduced as the woman gains a sense of calm and comfort. Floating is especially useful for providing relief to the spine, pelvis and feet during pregnancy. The pressure of the baby on the mother’s organs is reduced, allowing the mother to truly rest and even sleep.

During your third term, floating may be the only chance you have to experience intense rest.

The Mirror Effect

One interesting aspect of floating while pregnant is the concept of the “mirror effect.” When your body is suspended in the float room, it is experiencing a similar sensation that the baby is experiencing in the womb.

By mirroring the baby’s experience, many women find that floating allows them to deepen their connection with the child, both emotionally and physically.

I can only imagine how much of a special experience that is. Describing this to potential floater who is pregnant is always very exciting!

We also hear all sorts of stories about different baby activity while floating. Whether its doing loops in their newly spacious home or simply having a zen moment with mom, it can all happen in the room. Can you imagine how much stimulus is coming in to a baby all the time? To switch off all that sensory input isn’t just for you, little baby is also having a very unique experience as well!

Concerns

One of the number one concerns pregnant women have before a float is whether or not they can lay on their back. It’s awesome to be able to say “yes you can!”, because of the weightlessness in the float room, there isn’t direct pressure on the back that would normally cut of fluids. In the float room you can finally fall asleep on your back again.

The thought of lying in a dark room of water might sound a bit scary, but you can open the door or switch the light on at any time: therapists say it’s rare to feel claustrophobic as it feels more like you’re floating in outer space and the space around you feels infinite.

And the best news is that floating is safe throughout the whole nine months of pregnancy (but please see note below). Just imagine an hour to yourself, resting in warm water with gentle music soothing your senses and nothing to think about but you and your baby. Just lie back and enjoy…

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